Find out key laws every Maine landlord and tenant needs to know. Both landlords and tenants should be able to deal with many legal questions and problems without a lawyer, once they understand the basics of state law. This overview of key landlord-tenant laws in Maine will get you started.   Required Landlord Disclosures in Maine Under Maine law, landlords must disclose specific information to tenants (usually in the lease or rental agreement), such as the results of a mandatory test for radon and bedbug problems. For a full list, see Maine Required Landlord Disclosures.   Maine Security Deposit Limit and Return Maine state law limits how much a landlord can charge for a security deposit (two months’ rent), when it must be returned (within 30 days after a tenant moves if under a lease or written rental agreement or within 21 days if it is an at-will tenancy), and sets other restrictions on deposits. See Maine Security Deposit Limits and Deadlines for more on the subject.   Small Claims Lawsuits in Maine Tenants can sue landlords in small claims court for the return of their deposit, up to a dollar amount of $6,000. See Filing a Security Deposit Lawsuit in Maine Small Claims Court for advice for tenants filing suit. Landlords defending a security deposit lawsuit should check out Maine Landlord’s Guide to Security Deposit Disputes in Small Claims Court.   Maine Late Fees and Other Rent Rules State law regulates several rent-related issues, including late fees, the amount of notice (at least 45 days in Maine) landlords must give tenants to raise the rent, and how much time (seven days in Maine) a tenant has to pay rent or move before a landlord can file for eviction. For details, see Maine Late Fees, Termination for Nonpayment of Rent, and Other Rent Rules.   Tenant Rights to Withhold Rent in Maine Tenants may withhold rent or exercise the right to “repair and deduct” if a landlord fails to take care of important repairs, such as a broken heater. For specifics, see Maine Tenant Rights to Withhold Rent or “Repair and Deduct”.   Maine Termination and Eviction Rules State laws specify when and how a landlord may terminate a tenancy. For example, a landlord may give a Maine tenant at will who has caused substantial damage to the premises an unconditional quit notice that gives the tenant seven days to move out before the landlord can file for eviction. See State Laws on Unconditional Quit Terminations and State Laws on Termination for Violation of Lease for details on these types of termination notices in Maine.   Landlord Access to Rental Property, Tenant Protection Against Retaliation, and Other State Laws in Maine Several other landlord-tenant laws in Maine affect both property owners...